With your help, we can help advance medical knowledge and improve the health and well-being of countless others.

Our goal is to assist the pharmaceutical and medical device industries develop new and effective products to treat a multitude of medical conditions and illnesses. We perform this important work through the administration of clinical trials.

Please consider joining us in this effort. Our experienced and professional clinical research staff are highly qualified and fully committed to engaging you and your primary care physician as informed partners in everything we do.

Inpatient Studies

See if you pre-qualify for any of the research studies we are now conducting in your area by following one of the links below.

Outpatient Studies

See if you pre-qualify for any of the research studies we are now conducting in your area by following one of the links below.

Frequently Asked Questions

Clinical trials are conducted in phases. The trials at each phase have a different purpose and help scientists answer different questions:

In Phase I trials, researchers test an experimental drug or treatment in a small group of people (20-80) for the first time to evaluate its safety, determine a safe dosage range, and identify side effects.

In Phase II trials, the experimental study drug or treatment is given to a larger group of people (100-300) to see if it is effective and to further evaluate its safety.

In Phase III trials, the experimental study drug or treatment is given to large groups of people (1,000-3,000) to confirm its effectiveness, monitor side effects, compare it to commonly used treatments, and collect information that will allow the experimental drug or treatment to be used safely.

A protocol is a study plan on which all clinical trials are based. The plan is carefully designed to safeguard the health of the participants as well as answer specific research questions. A protocol describes what types of people may participate in the trial; the schedule of tests, procedures, medications, and dosages; and the length of the study. While in a clinical trial, participants following a protocol are seen regularly by the research staff to monitor their health and to determine the safety and effectiveness of their treatment.

Clinical trials are sponsored or funded by a variety of organizations or individuals such as physicians, medical institutions, foundations, voluntary groups, and pharmaceutical companies, in addition to federal agencies such as the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the Department of Defense (DOD), and the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). Trials can take place in a variety of locations, such as hospitals, universities, doctors’ offices, or community clinics.
The ethical and legal codes that govern medical practice also apply to clinical trials. In addition, most clinical research is federally regulated with built-in safeguards to protect the participants. The trial follows a carefully controlled protocol, a study plan which details what researchers will do in the study. As a clinical trial progresses, researchers report the results of the trial at scientific meetings, to medical journals, and to various government agencies. Individual participants’ names will remain secret and will not be mentioned in these reports.
Benefits

Clinical trials that are well-designed and well-executed are the best approach for eligible participants to:

Play an active role in their own health care.
Gain access to new research treatments before they are widely available.
Obtain expert medical care at leading healthcare facilities during the trial.
Help others by contributing to medical research.
Risks

There are risks to clinical trials.

There may be unpleasant, serious or even life-threatening side effects to experimental treatment.
The experimental treatment may not be effective for the participant.
The protocol may require more of their time and attention than would a non-protocol treatment, including trips to the study site, more treatments, hospital stays or complex dosage requirements.

Informed consent is the process of learning the key facts about a clinical trial before deciding whether or not to participate. It is also a continuing process throughout the study to provide information for participants. To help someone decide whether or not to participate, the doctors and nurses involved in the trial explain the details of the study. If the participant’s native language is not English, translation assistance can be provided. Then the research team provides an informed consent document that includes details about the study, such as its purpose, duration, required procedures, and key contacts. Risks and potential benefits are explained in the informed consent document. The participant then decides whether or not to sign the document. Informed consent is not a contract, and the participant may withdraw from the trial at any time.
The clinical trial process depends on the kind of trial being conducted (See What are the different types of clinical trials?) The clinical trial team includes doctors and nurses as well as social workers and other healthcare professionals. They check the health of the participant at the beginning of the trial, give specific instructions for participating in the trial, monitor the participant carefully during the trial, and stay in touch after the trial is completed.

Some clinical trials involve more tests and doctor visits than the participant would normally have for an illness or condition. For all types of trials, the participant works with a research team. Clinical trial participation is most successful when the protocol is carefully followed and there is frequent contact with the research staff.

All clinical trials have guidelines about who can participate. Using inclusion/exclusion criteria is an important principle of medical research that helps to produce reliable results. The factors that allow someone to participate in a clinical trial are called “inclusion criteria” and those that disallow someone from participating are called “exclusion criteria”. These criteria are based on such factors as age, gender, the type and stage of a disease, previous treatment history, and other medical conditions. Before joining a clinical trial, a participant must qualify for the study. Some research studies seek participants with illnesses or conditions to be studied in the clinical trial, while others need healthy participants. It is important to note that inclusion and exclusion criteria are not used to reject people personally. Instead, the criteria are used to identify appropriate participants and keep them safe. The criteria help ensure that researchers will be able to answer the questions they plan to study

Participants in clinical trials can play a more active role in their own health care, gain access to new research treatments before they are widely available, and help others by contributing to medical research.

Although there are many definitions of clinical trials, they are generally considered to be biomedical or health-related research studies in human beings that follow a predefined protocol. ClinicalTrials.gov includes both interventional and observational types of studies. Interventional studies are those in which the research subjects are assigned by the investigator to a treatment or other intervention, and their outcomes are measured. Observational studies are those in which individuals are observed and their outcomes are measured by the investigators.

Volunteer Form

To participate in studies, use the form below to volunteer. We will contact you within 48 hours to verify your eligibility and clarify any questions you may have.

By volunteering for clinical studies, you authorize AMR to store your personal information on file. In accordance with HIPAA regulations, AMR will never share your information with anyone.

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Name 

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Consent 
This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

Respiratory Syncytial Virus

It is estimated that more than 177,000 older adults are hospitalized and 14,000 of them die in the US due to RSV infections per year. In 2018, more elder Americans died from RSV infection than the common flu.

AMR locations nationwide are currently enrolling in investigational Adult RSV vaccine clinical research studies. Respiratory Syncytial Virus – or RSV – is most commonly discussed in children ages newborn to four. However, RSV, much like the flu or coronavirus, can cause long-term damage to the lungs. It can be life-threatening for adults 60 years and older and for those with compromised health conditions.
To learn more, call our enrollment line:
1-888-259-1231

Refer-A-Friend

Earn extra cash* by recommending a friend to us and receive up to $100 for each friend you refer!

The thousands of participants who have volunteered for clinical research studies with us have enabled us to play an important role in the advancement of medicine. This would not be possible without the help of our study volunteers. Thank you for partnering with us as we work together to improve the quality of life in our community. That said, we are always in need of additional study participants and are grateful when a friend or family member is recommended to us. As a thank-you for helping us, we are offering up to $100 for each eligible friend you refer to us.
Download Referral Form

Read Important Instructions

* Some restrictions apply. Not all studies are eligible for the Refer-A-Friend program. Ask an AMR representative for details.